Project Reading Chair: The catch-up

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OK, so how about we play a little catch-up? Here is a series of in progress pictures on my latest project a fine reading chair in English walnut. 

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Here's the board before marking out and cutting, stunning pattern hey. 


After the flurry of activity at the end of the second term - which culminated in the delivery of the auctioned console table to its magnificently grand new home and the completion of my first commission, a lovely keepsake box with feather inlay - I took advantage of a three week break to switch off from hand tools and catch up with friends, we also managed to fit in a well deserved break in the Scottish Borders. We stayed in a renovated potting shed cum pig sty, I highly recommend if you want a cosy bolt hole away for two - breathtaking scenery and walks right on the doorstep. 

Well it's back into the workshop with gusto, term three is all about taking my skills to the next level - think carving and curvy things -before that though I have a chair to finish; so let me bring you up to speed. 

During our second term we were all given the task of designing and making a chair, the more difficult the better after all this is about learning, so no harm in making the route steep and challenging. I wanted to make a chair comfortable enough to read and let the hours pass by perhaps even cosy enough to nod off on a Sunday afternoon. The design phase involved many drawings and mock up prototypes, chairs have tricky angles and many individual parts which need to be accurate to ensure a solid fit and a lifetime of use - Cardboard and selotape have become dear friends. 

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Here's a mock up with cardboard rear slats and a cushion, this is a quick and easy way to play around with form and proportion. 

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Arm: Mock-up fitted with cut out tenon to secure the arm to the front leg. 

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Arm: From mock-up to solid wood, notice the cut mortise to fit into the front leg. Next to shaping and fitting. 

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Rear Slat: From technical drawing to the actual thing. The rear slats are made up of hand-cut veneer planed smooth and vacuum pressed against a curved template. 

 

I have decided that this chair will not be sold as I want something at home to remind me of my craft and journey in becoming a furniture maker. I will use the design as a basis for Petrel's first product range, so if you think you would like something comfortable to sit on to while away an afternoon you may be in luck. 

Keep posted for the next stage - fitting the rear slats to the legs, Danish cord seat frame and home-made cushion oh and lets see if it all fits together.